PHILOSOPHICAL REFLECTIONS ON THE LIMITATIONS OF CONVENTIONAL MEDICINE

  • BRUCE JOHNSTON THE UNIVERSITY OF NEWCASTLE
  • PROFESSOR RONALD S. LAURA THE UNIVERSITY OF NEWCASTLE
Keywords: PHILOSOPHICAL REFLECTIONS, LIMITATIONS OF CONVENTIONAL, MEDICINE

Abstract

The central objective of this paper is to show that although contemporary western medicine represents a valuable approach to health, it lamentably remains an incomplete framework within which the achievement of its goals can be realised. (Laura, 2009) (p 34). In what follows we shall thus endeavour to establish that the philosophical presumptions underpinning the western medical-industrial complex in dealing with many modern day health problems are fundamentally misguided. Moreover, we shall argue that in certain contexts there has been both a misuse and abuse of its position of institutional power. This being so, we shall see that Medical Science, especially in regard to its liaison with the pharmaceutical industry, has been corrupted in the pursuit of profit, leaving the interests of
people’s health largely in the hands of the medical drug industry. Lest we be misunderstood, let us make clear that we make no pretence of denigrating the importance of conventional medicine and its quite remarkable achievements, though this is not to say that the dominant materialist foundations of the methodological approach to advancing community health represent a sufficient description of the wide array of our health problems. Our argument is
that although Conventional Medicine is an extremely valuable orientation to our current health problems, it remains an incomplete paradigm of healing in regard to chronic and degenerative diseases such as cancer and diabetes.

Author Biographies

BRUCE JOHNSTON, THE UNIVERSITY OF NEWCASTLE

THE UNIVERSITY OF NEWCASTLE

PROFESSOR RONALD S. LAURA, THE UNIVERSITY OF NEWCASTLE

THE UNIVERSITY OF NEWCASTLE

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Published
2018-01-31